AMERICAN PUBLIC MEDIA TO PRESENT A WEEK OF CONCERTS FROM THE WORLD-RENOWNED BBC PROMS

Contact: Ashley Lysne
651-290-1303
alysne@americanpublicmedia.org
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AMERICAN PUBLIC MEDIA TO PRESENT A WEEK OF CONCERTS FROM THE WORLD-RENOWNED BBC PROMS

"Last Night of the Proms" to be broadcast live from the Royal Albert Hall on September 10

(St. Paul, Minn.) — September 1, 2005 — American Public Media is proud to bring concerts from the BBC Proms to classical music listeners in the U.S.

The Proms is the world’s largest classical music festival, drawing exceptional orchestras and soloists to London for performances in the grand and historic Royal Albert Hall. For the U.S. broadcast series, we’ve chosen the best of the best. In the first program, one of the finest singers of her generation, Swedish soprano Anne-Sofie von Otter, will sing Gustav Mahler’s quot;Rückert Lieder,quot; with Sweden’s Gothenberg Symphony Orchestra. Other highlights include the annual Proms appearance by distinguished conductor Bernard Haitink, who’ll lead the London Symphony Orchestra in Ravel’s jazzy Piano Concerto in G, featuring soloist Hélène Grimaud. In Prom Five, the Cleveland Orchestra and Music Director Franz Welser-Mˆst will perform Mahler’s "Symphony No. 3."

SEPTEMBER 10: LAST NIGHT OF THE PROMS
Saturday, September 10, brings "The Last Night of the Proms," the climactic end to the festival. In front of the most boisterous crowd to be found at a classical music concert, the BBC Symphony Orchestra and conductor Paul Daniel will explore music inspired by the sea, one of this year’s Proms themes. They will be joined by outstanding soloists such as counter-tenor Andreas Scholl and guitar legend John Williams.

"The Last Night of the Proms" will be broadcast live from Royal Albert Hall. American Public Media host Brian Newhouse presents the concert and provides context for the performances.

ABOUT THE PROMS
The festival’s name is short for "promenade"; at Proms concerts there’s a singular feeling created by members of the audience who stand and move about on the floor of the hall, directly in front of the orchestra, throughout the entire performance.

The first Prom was presented 110 years ago in London as a way to bring classical music to the masses. Concert goers were offered popular programs, an informal atmosphere and inexpensive ticket prices. The BBC took over the festival in 1927. The Proms of today uphold the original spirit, encouraging participants to expand and enrich their classical music experiences.

TUNE IN: The BBC Proms will broadcast the week of Sept. 5-9 on stations nationwide. "The Last Night of the Proms" will be broadcast Saturday, September 10. Check local listings for time.